How to Make a DIY Podcast Recording Booth

DIY recording booth

One the most important things to remember when aiming for high-quality audio is to make sure that your recording environment is controlled as much as possible.

Now, you could spend lots of money and time in building or converting an area of your house with soundproofing and acoustic treatments but there are plenty of cheaper and less time-consuming ways to record high-quality audio.

Here are just a few examples on how to create working podcast space for you at home.

Building a DIY Recording Box

If you do want something more permanent for when you record then spending less than £30 on some acoustic treatment that can be placed inside a cardboard box makes a great DIY recording booth.

Just glue the acoustic foam — cut to size — to the inside of a box that’s large enough to house your microphone and you’ll have your very own DIY recording box that’ll help you capture clean audio that really limits room reverb.

Of course, you don’t have to spend any money if you don’t want to. With a little improvisation in some unusual positions you can still capture professional sounding audio without spending a penny.

NPR

Take these NPR reporters for example. If they’re not in their respective local studios then they’re probably at an airport, hotel room, at home, or some other space not conducive to recording. But what do they do? They record beneath blankets, jackets, and anything else that will help to reduce reverb and echo in their recording environment.

One of the great things they’re demonstrating here is that you can record almost anywhere you like or wherever you feel most comfortable. So if you’re sick of recording in the same place over and over again, then this might be a great approach for breaking up your routine.


The Memory Palace

Have you ever listened to The Memory Palace by Nate Dimeo from Radiotopia? First of all, you should because it’s a fantastic show.

If you have/when you have, do you notice how his recorded voice is clear and reverb free? That’s because he has been known to record beneath a mattress topper.

It certainly works because the show was a 2016 Peabody Award finalist and iTunes Best Podcast of 2015.


Hopefully this helps to demonstrate that you don’t need build an entire studio that costs thousands, spend time in someone else's studio, or even delve deep into your own wallet if you do want to do some DIY.

Remember, this is about controlling the environment so you can capture professional sounding, reverb free audio for your podcast.

Further Reading